Aug 24 is “Kalamay Fiesta” in San Leonardo Nueva Ecija (Sticky Rice Cake)

Kalamay Lansong

One of “Kalamay” variety (sticky rice cake) is “Kalamay Sunsong.” Awesome festivity in my parents hometown.

Kalamay cooking process - large pan we call talyase

Procedure is a bit old fashioned and physically exhausting

Kalamay sunsong with latik or cooked coconut oil as topings

Finish product is somehow fulfilling and delicious.

Most cut them to pieces for easy swallowing.

The blog owner does not claim ownership on all photos above.

(excerpted from google images)

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Service Oriented Church in Tagaytay City Philippines for Foreigners and Locals

When a person is down in the world, an ounce of help is better than a pound of preaching.
-Edward G. Bulwer-Lytton

 

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This blog does not claim ownership the the shown photos (excerpted from google images).

This writer to this blog is actually a part of a small international church in Tagaytay City Philippines, International Christian Fellowship.  Instead of joining a well facilitated church with extravagant facilities and building, he rather join a simple service oriented church that could not even pay for a nice facility but has a big heart in serving its few attendees. Among them are Foreign and Local Senior citizen, Cancer patients, poor member, children of all walks of like, and other people in the community (e.g. with weekly service at Drug Rehabilitation Institution, Policemen, Firemen, Special Children, etc.)

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For request, support and inquiry, anyone can attend or communicate directly to ICFT… https://www.facebook.com/icft.tagaytay?fref=ts

Nature Iodine rich Seaweeds

 seaweeds

There is a grape like green seaweed typically found on countries as Philippines (Caulerpa lentillifera).  This type of seaweeds is actually rich in Iodine, calcium, iron and vitamin A and C.

Many Filipinos call this seaweeds as “lato”, “ar-arusip” or “lato-bilog.”   In the northern Luzon, Philippines, many bought and eat them as fresh.  Recently, brine-salted lato is being exported to Japan and the United States . 

The blog author does not claim ownership to the shown photos.