Cav Banana, et al

We export all-in pack

packing8

dsc08552

unnamed

1n

You can email me directly at sembawangtrading.co@gmail.com

We also offer Banana Chips, Coconurt  Sugar, Banana Chips, Pineapples, etc.

Trials

We are in support of cancer patients and one of our beneficiary is a 31 year old lady with stage-3 Ovarian Cancer who is undergoing CHEMOTHERAPY.  The mother just lost her husband 9 months ago and talking to us every Sunday for strength.  I told the mother that I have nothing to offer because my wife is also under breast cancer treatment.  Nevertheless,  that I can try to finding donors even for the highly expensive medicines.    If you knew someone who can help, below is the actual prescriptions:

Below is the immediate requirement yet very costly.

If you can help or knew where we can solicit the medicines or any form of support, you can email me directly at denissalvatierra@yahoo.com

All I desire is to help save cancer patient lives within my reach yet lack financial capability to buy medicines or be treated.  I know how hard it is because my wife is also under treatment.  I thank God because I have earnings and I was able to solicit some of my wife’s medicines.  I am giving back by at least finding donors to a number of patients we help in our church.

The maker of the video does not claim ownership on the images used.

Moringa Juice is a Natural Antibiotic

Malunggay (Moringa) Juice… the best natural antibiotic and we experience it first hand.  It don’t taste good but it really cures ailment and viruses.   To improve its bitter taste, one author suggest to add honey.

Aside from the benefits of purification, detoxification, and anti-infection, moringa provides many other health benefits

as the leaves contain generous amounts of various essential nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that boost an individual’s immune system.

They are rich in Vitamins A and C, potassium, calcium, protein, iron, and folic acid. That is why daily consumption of this wonder plant can really do wonders to our health in general. It’s the best alternative medicine you can find. Better if you mix it with other vegetables through a juicer. It cures cancer, ulcer, diabetes, flu, etc.

There are various benefits and you can either eat or earn from it:

Oil from Moringa Seeds (better source of alternative fuel than Jatropha)

Moringa Capsules as supplement

Moringa Powder for Human and Animal consumption

Moringa can purify drinking water

Coffee blended with moringa

Moringa as high end cosmetics and body creams/oil

Moringa as nutritious viand and food igredients

Proven good source of mother’s milk

For malnutrition control

Moringa Ice Cream

Moringa Bread

Massage Oil

Moringa Cup Cake / Rice Cake

Moringa Cookies

Moringa Candy Flavor

Moringa Health Soft Drinks

For body rejuvination

For Fertility Enhancer

Moringa Pizza

Moringa Tea

There’s more!

photos are mostly excerpted from Google images

Blood Sugar Monitor

Value Pack

 

lancet – box of 100

Infinity Control Solution

Test Strip

Lancing Device

We offer these items .  You can email us for details at denissalvatierra@yahoo.com

 

 

Vertigo Perception vs Facts

I woke from a night sleep and suddenly I got this uneasy feeling on my head down to my neck.  I though it was low blood pressure but I was wrong.  The worst I did was presume and self medicate.   Though not fully recovered yet, thank God I am still alive to tell about it.

Have you had Vertigo?

Definition of Vertigo

Vertigo is a type of dizziness felt as a shift in a person’s relationship to the normal environment (a feeling that the room is spinning is common) or a sense of movement in space.

Although dizziness and vertigo are often used interchangeably, they are not the same thing. While all vertigo is dizziness, not all dizziness is vertigo.

True vertigo, from the Latin “vertere,” to turn, is a distinct, often severe form of dizziness that is a movement hallucination.

Description of Vertigo

There are four major types of dizziness –vertigo, presyncope, disequilibrium, and lightheadedness.

Most patients with true vertigo have a peripheral vestibular disorder, such as benign positional vertigo. This is usually associated with tinnitus and hearing loss.

Central disorders, such as brain stem or cerebellar lesions, tend to be more chronic but less intense than peripheral disorders and are not associated with hearing loss. Central disorders account for only 15 percent of patients with vertigo.

Vertigo is the illusion that you – or your surroundings – are moving. You may feel that you are spinning, tilting, rocking, or falling through space. You may vomit or have ringing in the ears (tinnitus). Also, your eyes may uncontrollably jerk back and forth (a condition called nystagmus).

Excerpt from http://www.healthscout.com/ency/68/462/main.html

Vertigo is already clear in the medical community and is commonly associated with the problem in the internal parts of the ear or hearing imbalance.  Nonetheless, causes may vary to other causes or from two other common sources:

  • Brain problem
  • Nerve problem

Other Known Causes:

  • Due to the free-floating calcium carbonate crystals in the posterior semicircular
  • Canal An infection in the ear fore example syphilis
  • Vision problems
  • Acute head injury
  • Cardiac conditions
  • Brain tumors
  • Thyroid disease
  • Anemia
  • Calcium disorders
  • Motion sickness
  • Insufficient blood supply to brain
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Diabetes

As the common causes are now clearly identified, treatment is now easier for the medical practitioners as per below historical documentation.

Why ear? This body part regulates the balance to overall parts.

Why brain? It sends the signals to the inner part of the ear.

Why nerves? The nerves between ear and brain are responsible for the regulation of communication between those two parts of your body.

There can be others.

Treatment Suggestions coming from Medical Community:

(please do not self medicate, better to consult a Doctor)

1. Inner Ear Problem.

Vestibular rehabilitation is suggested treatment with therapy to cure whatever is resulting from the inner ear.  Improvement could be seen in days to a couple of weeks. Six months is the maximum time frame, depending on the situation.

2. Brain Cause.

In some cases, brain illnesses can be another cause but this is not a life threatening situation.  Similar with inner ear causes, such is just misalignments that affect relaying of signals from brain to the ear.  Suggested treatment is neurotransmitter reuptake inhibitors.  Unlike from inner ear problem, treatment for this is at times immeasurable and at least a minimum of 6 months.

3. Problem from the Nerves between ear and brain.

Suggested treatments are the likes of antihistamines, calcium antagonists and the Epley manoeuvre, and so on and so forth.  This should only be performed by highly qualified health professional.

Make sure you consult a Doctor and have a blood test first before any treatment as there are risk factor involve.

Image is excerpt from http://www.emedicinehealth.com/vertigo/article_em.htm

Obesity is already an Intational Issue

Obesity is plain and simple over weight.

History truly repeats itself, obesity was one characteristics of people from great nations of the past as Rome and Greece.  These was clearly seen through renaissance art paintings and sculptures.

Obesity can no longer be ignored in most countries and already been a national health issue as in the United States.

More facts about obesity as stated by World Health Organization.  Please refer to below excerpt or just click to link below for more details…

http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/publications/facts/obesity/en/

Quote:

Obesity and overweight

Facts

  • Globally, there are more than 1 billion overweight adults, at least 300 million of them obese.
  • Obesity and overweight pose a major risk for chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and stroke, and certain forms of cancer.
  • The key causes are increased consumption of energy-dense foods high in saturated fats and sugars, and reduced physical activity.

Obesity has reached epidemic proportions globally, with more than 1 billion adults overweight – at least 300 million of them clinically obese – and is a major contributor to the global burden of chronic disease and disability. Often coexisting in developing countries with under-nutrition, obesity is a complex condition, with serious social and psychological dimensions, affecting virtually all ages and socioeconomic groups.

Increased consumption of more energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods with high levels of sugar and saturated fats, combined with reduced physical activity, have led to obesity rates that have risen three-fold or more since 1980 in some areas of North America, the United Kingdom, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, the Pacific Islands, Australasia and China.The obesity epidemic is not restricted to industrialized societies; this increase is often faster in developing countries than in the developed world.

Obesity and overweight pose a major risk for serious diet-related chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and stroke, and certain forms of cancer. The health consequences range from increased risk of premature death, to serious chronic conditions that reduce the overall quality of life. Of especial concern is the increasing incidence of child obesity.

Why is this happening?

The rising epidemic reflects the profound changes in society and in behavioural patterns of communities over recent decades. While genes are important in determining a person’s susceptibility to weight gain, energy balance is determined by calorie intake and physical activity. Thus societal changes and worldwide nutrition transition are driving the obesity epidemic. Economic growth, modernization, urbanization and globalization of food markets are just some of the forces thought to underlie the epidemic.

As incomes rise and populations become more urban, diets high in complex arbohydrates give way to more varied diets with a higher proportion of fats, saturated fats and sugars. At the same time, large shifts towards less physically demanding work have been observed worldwide. Moves towards less physical activity are also found in the increasing use of automated transport, technology in the home, and more passive leisure pursuits.

How do we define obesity and overweight?

The prevalence of overweight and obesity is commonly assessed by using body mass index (BMI), defined as the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in metres (kg/m2 ). A BMI over 25 kg/m2 is defined as overweight, and a BMI of over 30 kg/m2 as obese. These markers provide common benchmarks for assessment, but the risks of disease in all populations can increase progressively from lower BMI levels.

Adult mean BMI levels of 22-23 kg/m2 are found in Africa and Asia, while levels of 25-27 kg/m2 are prevalent across North America, Europe, and in some Latin American, North African and Pacific Island countries. BMI increases amongst middle-aged elderly people, who are at the greatest risk of health complications. In countries undergoing nutrition transition, overnutrition often co-exists with undernutrition. People with a BMI below 18.5 kg/m2 tend to be underweight.

The distribution of BMI is shifting upwards in many populations. And recent studies have shown that people who were undernourished in early life and then become obese in adulthood, tend to develop conditions such as high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes at an earlier age and in more severe form than those who were never undernourished.

The extent of the problem

Currently more than 1 billion adults are overweight – and at least 300 million of them are clinically obese. Current obesity levels range from below 5% in China, Japan and certain African nations, to over 75% in urban Samoa. But even in relatively low prevalence countries like China, rates are almost 20% in some cities.

Childhood obesity is already epidemic in some areas and on the rise in others. An estimated 22 million children under five are estimated to be overweight worldwide. According to the US Surgeon General, in the USA the number of overweight children has doubled and the number of overweight adolescents has trebled since 1980. The prevalence of obese children aged 6-to-11 years has more than doubled since the 1960s. Obesity prevalence in youths aged 12-17 has increased dramatically from 5% to 13% in boys and from 5% to 9% in girls between 1966-70 and 1988-91 in the USA. The problem is global and increasingly extends into the developing world; for example, in Thailand the prevalence of obesity in 5-to-12 year olds children rose from12.2% to 15-6% in just two years.

Obesity accounts for 2-6% of total health care costs in several developed countries; some estimates put the figure as high as 7%. The true costs are undoubtedly much greater as not all obesity-related conditions are included in the calculations.

How does excess body fat impact health?

Overweight and obesity lead to adverse metabolic effects on blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides and insulin resistance. Some confusion of the consequences of obesity arise because researchers have used different BMI cut-offs, and because the presence of many medical conditions involved in the development of obesity may confuse the effects of obesity itself.

The non-fatal, but debilitating health problems associated with obesity include respiratory difficulties, chronic musculoskeletal problems, skin problems and infertility. The more life-threatening problems fall into four main areas: CVD problems; conditions associated with insulin resistance such as type 2 diabetes; certain types of cancers, especially the hormonally related and large-bowel cancers; and gallbladder disease.

The likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes and hypertension rises steeply with increasing body fatness. Confined to older adults for most of the 20th century, this disease now affects obese children even before puberty. Approximately 85% of people with diabetes are type 2, and of these, 90% are obese or overweight. And this is increasingly becoming a developing world problem. In 1995, the Emerging Market Economies had the highest number of diabetics. If current trends continue, India and the Middle Eastern crescent will have taken over by 2025.Large increases would also be observed in China, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the rest of Asia.

Raised BMI also increases the risks of cancer of the breast, colon, prostate, endometroium, kidney and gallbladder. Chronic overweight and obesity contribute significantly to osteoarthritis, a major cause of disability in adults. Although obesity should be considered a disease in its own right, it is also one of the key risk factors for other chronic diseases together with smoking, high blood pressure and high blood cholesterol. In the analyses carried out for World Health Report 2002, approximately 58% of diabetes and 21% of ischaemic heart disease and 8-42% of certain cancers globally were attributable to a BMI above 21 kg/m2.

What can we do about it?

Effective weight management for individuals and groups at risk of developing obesity involves a range of long-term strategies. These include prevention, weight maintenance, management of co-morbidities and weight loss. They should be part of an integrated, multi-sectoral, population-based approach, which includes environmental support for healthy diets and regular physical activity. Key elements include:

  • Creating supportive population-based environments through public policies that promote the availability and accessibility of a variety of low-fat, high-fibre foods, and that provide opportunities for physical activity.
  • Promoting healthy behaviours to encourage, motivate and enable individuals to lose weight by: – eating more fruit and vegetables, as well as nuts and whole grains;
    – engaging in daily moderate physical activity for at least 30 minutes;
    – cutting the amount of fatty, sugary foods in the diet;
    – moving from saturated animal-based fats to unsaturated vegetable-oil based fats.
  • Mounting a clinical response to the existing burden of obesity and associated conditions through clinical programmes and staff training to ensure effective support for those affected to lose weight or avoid further weight gain.
photo is excerpt from Google images