Cav Banana, et al

We export all-in pack

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You can email me directly at sembawangtrading.co@gmail.com

We also offer Banana Chips, Coconurt  Sugar, Banana Chips, Pineapples, etc.

Size does matter in Cavendish Bananas

 

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Davao Philippines’Cavendish Bananas is known deliciously sweet.

  • Philippine is now the 2nd Largest Exporter of Bananas in the world.
  • The majority of these shipments are destined for the growing regional markets of China, the Middle East and, to a lesser extent, Russia to satisfy their demand for fresh produce
  • Exports of Philippine bananas for the last quarter of this year are expected to rise following China’s lifting of restrictions on Philippine exports early this month.
  • Below are the 15 countries that accounted for the highest dollar value worth of bananas exported from the Philippines during 2015:
  1. Japan: US$176.9 million (40.2% of total bananas imports)
  2. China: $109.2 million (24.8%)
  3. South Korea: $51.6 million (11.7%)
  4. Iran: $33.8 million (7.7%)
  5. United Arab Emirates: $19.2 million (4.4%)
  6. Saudi Arabia: $12.9 million (2.9%)
  7. Kuwait: $8.7 million (2%)
  8. New Zealand: $6.5 million (1.5%)
  9. Hong Kong: $5.2 million (1.2%)
  10. Singapore: $5.1 million (1.2%)
  11. Malaysia: $2.3 million (0.5%)
  12. Taiwan: $2.1 million (0.5%)
  13. North Korea: $1.7 million (0.4%)
  14. Bahrain: $1.1 million (0.2%)
  15. Qatar: $912,000 (0.2%)
  • Among the above countries, the fastest-growing consumers of Philippine bananas exports since 2011 were: Bahrain (up 822.2% in value), Saudi Arabia (up 638.1%), Malaysia (up 312.3%) and Kuwait (up 195.4%).Production system ranges from backyard to highly integrated operation with the latter catering to the export market.
  • Weak demand in the EU.
  • Total import of fruit by the Philippines from 2008 till 2013. The highest volume of imports occurred in 2012 reaching 240,477MT while the lowest was in 2008 to 187,265MT. The average annual growth rate was 3.68% during this time period.
  • Philippine farms produced a total of 8.65m tonnes of bananas valued at P117.15bn ($2.6bn) in 2013, down from a peak of 9.23m tonnes worth P108.13bn ($2.4bn) the previous year, according to PSA data. Concerted efforts over the past two decades to expand banana production have led to the commodity becoming the country’s most valuable crop as well as its most profitable agricultural export.
  • The past years, the yield dramatically been reduced due to destruction brought about by the strong typhoons that hit the country particularly the major producing areas in Mindanao. Another calamity was the most recent “El Nino.”  Nevertheless, these are not typical and Mindanao is not a typhoon belt.
  • Overall, the average annual growth rate was 0.26% and 16%, respectively for production and area for the six-year time period.
  • The farms are generally small in size (1-5 ha) with minimal care resulting to low yield.
  • Big farms are typically managed by Cooperatives, Organizations and Investment Companies

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This business walk an extra mile for its clients.  It literally exist to assist.

Interested importers can email us directly at sembawangtrading.co@gmail.com for further details.

 

Ironically

I am in Tagaytay City Philippine right now and  I was surprised to see tourists all over the place.  Come to think of it… many of them are East and South East Asian speaking in Chinese language.   I was  just surprised because they look unbothered and unaffected from the negative news and publicity Philippines is getting from countries as China, Australia, etc.

No offense to the affected.  Of course, we Filipinos are saddened and sympathize with the concerned.  It’s just that life must go on, though both parties are searching for justice and credible investigation is in progress.

I know how hard it is to forgive at this point.  But hope this could lead to cooperation on how to better facilitate incidents as the painful hostage crisis that happened; and granting of tools or gadgets for better counter crimes and counter terrorism.

If you are a tourist wishing to visit the Philippines or would want to acquire properties (for business or residential), I will be gladly assist you if you want.  You can e-mail me directly at denissalvatierra@yahoo.com

Cast the first stone

Philippines got the attention of the world again.

If insults and criticism could kill, most Filipinos in the face of the earth may have been annihilated  by now — most of them are in Hong Kong, China and countries in South East Asia.  Death toll could have been worse than Nuclear Holocaust or what the Germans did to the Jews during World War II.   This could have been more awful than the effects of weapons of mass destructions.

Don’t make me wrong.  I sympathize to the families and countrymen of the hostage victims and I belong to those who apologize for the mistakes of some of my countrymen.  It’s just that persecution of its nationals for the mistakes of some of their country men is also not right.

Many do not realize that both parties were victims and the effects are more destructive to the Philippines as more will lose their jobs due to almost collapse of stock markour et, cancellation of travel and hotel accommodation, fear among travellers, etc.  I do not justify the mistakes made but it was only done by some, yet it made a mockery of the Philippines as a whole.  And our relatives and countrymen that works or migrated in other countries, though has obviously nothing to do is now suffering from persecution due to what had happened.  This is worse than bullets.

While the whole world is busy giving negative comments, I could not help but ask.  Is this incident worst than what happened to the Hostage in 1972 Munich Massacre? Or worst than 1979 Iran Hostage Crisis? Hollocaust? 911 Attacked? Hostage Drama in Russia? …Need I say more?  This won’t justify the killings and mishandling but punishing the crushing Philippine economy and tourism through destructive criticism is worst.

Nonetheless, let me assure the world that Filipinos are still one of the most hospitable and most gracious people on earth and someone’s life is incomplete if haven’t been or seen the beauty of the Philippines.  Surely justice will be serve and security will be tightened.  I myself have friends in the Police forces and they are highly trained and excelled in international trainings.   What happened were unmistakably mishandling and miscalculation of the incident within the ranks and policy.  What happened was purely an isolated case and unintentional.  We apologize for our imperfection as no one and no country is perfect.

Rest assured that we will still be the most service oriented and most caring people that could even volunteer to the worst situation no other nationals would be even dare look or visit.  We Filipinos will always be proud of our country, heritage and culture. Our country may not have the development and advancement yet but our natural resources are beyond comprehension and truly the best tourist attraction in the world.  As what the environmentalist have said, Philippines is definitely the center of the center in marine bio diversity… and there’s more.  Why not view the video below and you yourself analyze how safe and beautiful is the Philippine archipelago.

There’s even more!

Sea Cucumber Means Money

To tell you honestly, I am not an expert on sea cucumbers. I first heard it through a Christian radio program. Since then I got curious until I attended a session and discovered so many things.  One is I found out that this aquatic resource is common in the Philippines yet only a few knew its high income potentials if cultivated and process properly. I could not believe how high the demand for this aquatic resource  in the international market.  This could mean livelihood to many to aleviate poverty or entrepreneurial pursuits or investment opportunity. I need not be a business guru to understand that this matter.  So are you.

Sea cucumbers are actually not new to Philippines as our country is surrounded by bodies of waters. Harvesting of sea cucumbers has been a source of income to many families in the Philippines, especially to those living near the sea shores.  It’s just that many of us still need to be educated on its proper cultivation and processing for a more profitable business and long term source of income.

Let me quote a portion from an article written by an expert on this field…                                                                                       excerpt from http://www.bar.gov.ph/bardigest/2004/aprjun04_brightpotential.asp

Quote:

Sea cucumbers may be weird marine creatures but to some people, they are delectable.  Across Asia, they have long been a staple in peoples’ diets, mainly in soups, stews and stir-fries. They are highly nutritious — described as “an ideal tonic food” — as they provide more protein and less fat than most foods. “Like tofu, it is flavorless but absorbs the flavors of its surrounding seasonings and foods,” wrote a food maven and epicure.

Generally, sea cucumbers are sold as trepang, which is easier to store and handle than the fresh product. They are valued as an exotic delicacy and a flavorful condiment for soups, noodles and other dishes.

In some parts of Europe, whole beche-de-mer can be stuffed with a filling of pork, cornstarch and chopped fried fish. Cooked fresh and quickly on a hot griddle, espardenyes are served with olive, sea salt and a squeeze of lemon in Spain.

Like their terrestrial cousins, sea cucumbers can — unsurprisingly, perhaps — also be pickled. In some instances, they are prepared as salads and eaten fresh minus the internal organs. In other parts of the world, the internal organs of some species like Stichopus variegatus are also fermented for food.

To some people, sea cucumbers are more than just food. In fact, there are people who believe sea animals possess some aphrodisiac powers. The reason for this belief is the peculiar reaction of the creature on being kneaded or disturbed slightly with fingers. It swells and stiffens and a jet of water is released from one end. This behavior is similar to the erection and subsequent ejaculation of the male sexual organ.

By the way, people in Palau use the sea cucumber to protect their feet when walking in the reef. They squeeze the sea cucumber until it squirts out sticky threads, which they put on their feet. Even though this practice may sound harsh, the sea cucumber returns to the reef unharmed.

In the Philippines, sea cucumbers are found in burrows, seagrass beds or sandy areas with large amounts of coral rubbles. Some are found in waters of up to 20 meters deep. These can be found off the coastal waters of Zamboanga City; Zamboanga del Sur; Zamboanga del Norte; Basilan Province; Jolo, Sulu; South Cotabato; Surigao del Norte; Villas eal and Catbalogan, Samar; Negros Occidental; Cebu; Calatagan, Bangas; Polilio Island, Quezon; Masinloc, Zambales; San Vicente, Cagayan; San Fernando, La Union; Bolinao, Bani and Alaminos, Pangasinan.

For almost a century, the harvesting and processing of sea cucumbers has been a source of income for many Filipino families. As Naga, the publication of the World Fish Center, reported in 1987: “The steady demand for sea cucumbers from other countries has made sea cucumber harvesting an attractive source of income for many Filipinos. In many islands and coastal villages, the income derived from it constitutes a significant portion of a family’s livelihood.”

Today, sea cucumber is a multi-million dollar industry.  In the United States, price rate of dried sea cucumber is pegged at US$180 to US$250 per kilogram. The Philippines is home to 100 species of sea cucumbers, of which 31 are commercially important. “There is a big export market for sea cucumbers particularly for Hong Kong, China, Korea and Japan,” says Dr. Rafael D. Guerrero III, former executive director of the Laguna-based Philippine Council for Aquatic and Marine Research and Development (PCAMRD). Aside from food, there’s also an emerging market for the use of sea cucumbers in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Common medicinal uses of sea cucumber in China include treating: weakness, impotence, debility of the aged, constipation due to intestinal dryness, and frequent urination. As demand continues to escalate, the supply dwindles – to the extent that their population is now in jeopardy.

Sea cucumber stocks are under intense fishing pressure throughout the world, according to a recent report released by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Most high value commercial species have been depleted. In Asia and the Pacific, the most sought-after species are largely depleted. The region generates some 20,000 to 40,000 tons per year, which are exported to China and other Asian markets. Most of them come from Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and the Philippines.

“The fast pace of development of sea cucumber fisheries to supply growing international demand is placing most fisheries and many sea cucumber species at risk,” pointed out the FAO report, Sea Cucumbers: A Global Review of Fisheries and Trade. Sea cucumbers are utilized almost exclusively as an export commodity. This huge export makes the population of sea cucumbers in the country to decline significantly. “Yes, we used to have a lot of sea cucumbers in our coastal areas,” admits Dr. Guerrero. “They have been depleted because of over-harvesting.”

But the good news is: There are now on-going projects for the artificial breeding and culture of sea cucumbers being conducted by the Marine Science Institute (MST) of the University of the Philippines (UP) in Bolinao, Pangasinan. In Mindanao, the UP is also conducting pond culture of sea cucumber in Davao City, in cooperation with a private entity, the Alson Aquaculture.

In addition, the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) has recently established the country’s first-ever commercial hatchery for sea cucumber to enhance massive raising of the commodity nationwide. The hatchery produces 60,000 “juvenile” sea cucumbers every month, which can be distributed to farmers who are interested in culturing them in fish ponds, or for sea ranching (stocking them in a designated space in the sea for gathering later).

“Sea cucumber is a good material for sea ranching because, based on its behavior, it can travel just one to two meters a day and about one kilometer a year,” the BFAR said in a statement.

The mortality rate of cultured juveniles is high. But once they weigh 20 grams and placed in the seafloor or in ponds, the survival rate is almost 100%, according to Dr. Westly Rosario, executive director of the BFAR’s National Fisheries Research Development Institute.

In a recent report, Northern Luzon news reporter Yolanda Fuertes wrote: “Aside from the initial cost of the juvenile sea cucumbers (Php5 each), they are not fed commercial food, depending only on organic matter in the culture pond for nourishment (salinity should be at least 20 parts per thousand) or the sea tidal flats which are their natural habitats.”

Dr. Guerrero said that sea farming of sea cucumbers “can be a profitable and environmentally-friendly livelihood industry for coastal communities.” The PCAMRD, a line agency of the Department of Science and Technology, is supporting such kind of projects.

A study conducted at BFAR showed that it takes six months for the sea cucumber to reach 250 grams, the desired weight in the export market. One hectare of fishpond can accommodate 10,000 sea cucumbers.  This means that after six months, a farmer can harvest at least 2.5 tons. But before they can be exported, they have to be dried first – shrunk to about 10% of their live weight. So, the marketable harvest would only be 250 kilograms. At P4,000 per kilogram, the farmer earns a whooping Phpi million from his one-hectare pond in six months.

Unquote.

As I have said earlier, we just excerpt above article from http://www.bar.gov.ph/bardigest/2004/aprjun04_brightpotential.asp

For more specific details about sea cucumber, you may click to link below for more info.

Link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_cucumber

http://www.spc.int/coastfish/news/bdm/13/03.Schoppe.html

http://www.fao.org/docrep/007/y5501e/y5501e0c.htm

http://www.bar.gov.ph/bardigest/2004/aprjun04_brightpotential.asp

 ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/011/i0375e/i0375e04.pdf

For interested investors, entrepreneurs and those who would want to enter into the sea cucumber business, I can refer you to someone who is sincerely promoting it. Not to mention other agriculture and aqua culture potentials he help promote and develops in the past. His details are available upon request.

Photos are excerpt from Google Images, credits to below link: http://www.diytrade.com/china/4/manufacturers/820682/main/Denma_Trading_Company.html

 http://www.scientificamerican.com/blog/60-second-science/post.cfm?id=high-demand-in-china-threatens-phil-2009-06-25

http://endoftheline.com/blog/archives/date/2009/04