Cav Banana, et al

We export all-in pack

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You can email me directly at sembawangtrading.co@gmail.com

We also offer Banana Chips, Coconurt  Sugar, Banana Chips, Pineapples, etc.

Size does matter in Cavendish Bananas

 

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Davao Philippines’Cavendish Bananas is known deliciously sweet.

  • Philippine is now the 2nd Largest Exporter of Bananas in the world.
  • The majority of these shipments are destined for the growing regional markets of China, the Middle East and, to a lesser extent, Russia to satisfy their demand for fresh produce
  • Exports of Philippine bananas for the last quarter of this year are expected to rise following China’s lifting of restrictions on Philippine exports early this month.
  • Below are the 15 countries that accounted for the highest dollar value worth of bananas exported from the Philippines during 2015:
  1. Japan: US$176.9 million (40.2% of total bananas imports)
  2. China: $109.2 million (24.8%)
  3. South Korea: $51.6 million (11.7%)
  4. Iran: $33.8 million (7.7%)
  5. United Arab Emirates: $19.2 million (4.4%)
  6. Saudi Arabia: $12.9 million (2.9%)
  7. Kuwait: $8.7 million (2%)
  8. New Zealand: $6.5 million (1.5%)
  9. Hong Kong: $5.2 million (1.2%)
  10. Singapore: $5.1 million (1.2%)
  11. Malaysia: $2.3 million (0.5%)
  12. Taiwan: $2.1 million (0.5%)
  13. North Korea: $1.7 million (0.4%)
  14. Bahrain: $1.1 million (0.2%)
  15. Qatar: $912,000 (0.2%)
  • Among the above countries, the fastest-growing consumers of Philippine bananas exports since 2011 were: Bahrain (up 822.2% in value), Saudi Arabia (up 638.1%), Malaysia (up 312.3%) and Kuwait (up 195.4%).Production system ranges from backyard to highly integrated operation with the latter catering to the export market.
  • Weak demand in the EU.
  • Total import of fruit by the Philippines from 2008 till 2013. The highest volume of imports occurred in 2012 reaching 240,477MT while the lowest was in 2008 to 187,265MT. The average annual growth rate was 3.68% during this time period.
  • Philippine farms produced a total of 8.65m tonnes of bananas valued at P117.15bn ($2.6bn) in 2013, down from a peak of 9.23m tonnes worth P108.13bn ($2.4bn) the previous year, according to PSA data. Concerted efforts over the past two decades to expand banana production have led to the commodity becoming the country’s most valuable crop as well as its most profitable agricultural export.
  • The past years, the yield dramatically been reduced due to destruction brought about by the strong typhoons that hit the country particularly the major producing areas in Mindanao. Another calamity was the most recent “El Nino.”  Nevertheless, these are not typical and Mindanao is not a typhoon belt.
  • Overall, the average annual growth rate was 0.26% and 16%, respectively for production and area for the six-year time period.
  • The farms are generally small in size (1-5 ha) with minimal care resulting to low yield.
  • Big farms are typically managed by Cooperatives, Organizations and Investment Companies

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This business walk an extra mile for its clients.  It literally exist to assist.

Interested importers can email us directly at sembawangtrading.co@gmail.com for further details.

 

An Apple A Day

An Apple a day did not keep Steve Jobs’s doctors away. Nevertheless his ailment did not stop his creativity and passion from fulfilling his destiny till to his death bed.

“No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because death is very likely the single best invention of life.”  –Steve Jobs

photo is excerpt from Google images

Why We Need Innovation, Not Just Insulation

Excerpt Article – Originally published on The Gates Notes, Writer: Bill Gates, Co-founder and co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

People often present two timeframes that we should have as goals for CO2 reduction – 30% (off of some baseline) by 2025 and 80% by 2050.

I believe the key one to achieve is 80% by 2050.

But we tend to focus on the first one since it is much more concrete.

We don’t distinguish properly between things that put you on a path to making the 80% goal by 2050 and things that don’t really help.

To make the 80% goal by 2050 we are going to have to reduce emissions from transportation and electrical production in participating countries down to zero.

You will still have emissions from other activities including domestic animals, making fertilizer, and decay processes.

There will still be countries that are too poor to participate.

If the goal is to get the transportation and electrical sectors down to zero emissions you clearly need innovation that leads to entirely new approaches to generating power.

Should society spend a lot of time trying to insulate houses and telling people to turn off lights or should it spend time on accelerating innovation?

If addressing climate change only requires us to get to the 2025 goal, then efficiency would be the key thing.

But you can never insulate your way to anything close to zero no matter what advocates of resource efficiency say. You can never reduce consumerism to anything close to zero.

Because 2025 is too soon for innovation to be completed and widely deployed, behavior change still matters.

Still, the amount of CO2 avoided by these kinds of modest reduction efforts will not be the key to what happens with climate change in the long run.

In fact it is doubtful that any such efforts in the rich countries will even offset the increase coming from richer lifestyles in places like China, India, Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, etc.

Innovation in transportation and electricity will be the key factor.

One of the reasons I bring this up is that I hear a lot of climate change experts focus totally on 2025 or talk about how great it is that there is so much low hanging fruit that will make a difference.

This mostly focuses on saving a little bit of energy, which by itself is simply not enough. The need to get to zero emissions in key sectors almost never gets mentioned. The danger is people will think they just need to do a little bit and things will be fine.

If CO2 reduction is important, we need to make it clear to people what really matters – getting to zero.

With that kind of clarity, people will understand the need to get to zero and begin to grasp the scope and scale of innovation that is needed.

However all the talk about renewable portfolios, efficiency, and cap and trade tends to obscure the specific things that need to be done.

To achieve the kinds of innovations that will be required I think a distributed system of R&D with economic rewards for innovators and strong government encouragement is the key. There just isn’t enough work going on today to get us to where we need to go.

My point is not to denigrate efficiency. Slowing the growth of CO2 ppm is of course a good thing. And there are of course lots of cheap, and in many cases self-funding efficiency gains to be made.

We should at the least fix market barriers and dysfunctions that prevent these gains from being realized. That’s just being smart.

But it’s not enough to slow the growth of CO2 given the strength of demand driven by the poor who need to get access energy. And, we have to actually stop it at some point.

No amount of insulation will get us there, only innovating our way to essentially 0-carbon energy technology will do it. If we focus on just efficiency to the exclusion of innovation, or imagine that we can worry about efficiency first and worry about energy innovation later, we won’t get there.

The world is distracted from what counts on this issue in a big way.

Photo is excerpt from google images